Canadian Heraldic Dictionary

Dictionary entries beginning with the letter A Dictionary entries beginning with the letter B Dictionary entries beginning with the letter C Dictionary entries beginning with the letter D Dictionary entries beginning with the letter E Dictionary entries beginning with the letter F Dictionary entries beginning with the letter G Dictionary entries beginning with the letter H Dictionary entries beginning with the letter I Dictionary entries beginning with the letter J Dictionary entries beginning with the letter K Dictionary entries beginning with the letter L Dictionary entries beginning with the letter M Dictionary entries beginning with the letter N Dictionary entries beginning with the letter O Dictionary entries beginning with the letter P Dictionary entries beginning with the letter Q Dictionary entries beginning with the letter R Dictionary entries beginning with the letter S Dictionary entries beginning with the letter T Dictionary entries beginning with the letter U Dictionary entries beginning with the letter V Dictionary entries beginning with the letter W Dictionary entries beginning with the letter X Dictionary entries beginning with the letter Y Dictionary entries beginning with the letter Z

Term Source Meaning Illustration
Canadian Fess District of Burnaby Following the lead of the Canadian pale (see below) the Canadian fess (an extra-wide fess) has followed.
Canada Goose Gander, Nfld. The bird most often associated with Canada.
Canadian Martlet Cairns A martlet depicted so that its wings and tail resemble a maple leaf (see also Maple Leaf Martlet, which is identical).
Canadian Pale N. William B. Rehder Originating with the Canadian flag, the Canadian pale (occupying one-half of the width of the flag or shield) has become popular in flags and the use has also been extended to shields.
Canterbury Cap Cape Breton College A red soft cap with a raised ridge in the centre.
Cantoned London Police Service A term applied primarily to rectangular items such as banners. It refers to charges placed in the four corners of the field, as are the flower clusters shown here.
Caribou Van Bibber, G The ungulate of Northern North America, often associated with the Canadian arctic regions.
Cathedra St. Paul's Cathedral, Regina The Cathedra or Bishop's chair was introduced into Canadian heraldry as the supporter for the arms of a cathedral, bearing additionally the arms of the diocese on the tympanum. It is no longer blazoned as a supporter but is considered as a form of display.
Chapé embowed Blizzard The term chapé is defined in Friar as "parted per chevron enhanced", but the enhancement is not evident here. Since this very attractive figure resembling a curtain is commonly used for persons associated with the theatre, it might be worth creating it as a Canadian sub-ordinary in the depicted form (possibly called a "rideau") and using the more traditional blazon when the lines are straight.
Chinese Lion Chui This lion is also stylized, but in a very different manner from that of the European heraldic lion.
Chinese Phoenix Rt. Hon. Adrienne Clarkson Again a stylized bird, but also different from the European version.
Cochlea Ling An obscure term for a snail shell.
Cog Wheel Lougheed The cog wheel (a steel wheel with squared projections on its outer edge) is often used to refer to persons or institutions associated with mechanical engineering (see also gear wheel, for which it is a synonym).
Confucian Hat Chui Hat traditionally worn by Confucian scholars in China.
Construct Kiang A useful term to describe a grouping of geometrical figures. That illustrated is blazoned as "a construct of five hexagons in saltire."
Coronet Dancetty City of Penticton A coronet whose rim is heightened by a series of triangles, their bases in contact to resemble the partition-line dancetty.
Coronet Érablé Heinricks A coronet set with maple leaves, typically three visible.
Coronet, Loyalist Civil John D. Hongisto A coronet showing three maple leaves alternating with two oak leaves.
Coronet, Loyalist Military Mikel A coronet showing three maple leaves alternating with pairs of swords crossed in saltire.
Coronet, St. John Harding A coronet set with Maltese crosses, typically three showing.
Cotised St. George's Society "Argent a cross cotised by eight demi maple leaves Gules." This is a variant of the term cotised, which traditionally implies that an ordinary is accompanied by straight, narrow bands (diminutives of the ordinary in question). In Canadian practice, the cotises may be formed by the halves of a laterally symmetrical charge such as a fleur-de-lis, fir tree or (as in this case) a maple leaf.
Couched Niagara Region "… twelve chevrons couched dexter". This is variant Canadian usage of the term couched to refer to an ordinary lying on its side, since the term normally applies to animals (lying down with head up), or to shields (aslant).
Crochet Asper The quarter note, as shown in musical notation.
Cross Canterbury Parson This particularly attractive cross cannot, surprisingly, be found in any of the author’s references. It does, however, appear in a Canadian grant.
Cross Érablé MacDonald, Rural Municipality A cross whose three upper extremities terminate in maple leaves.
Cross Fretty Fisher, H.G. Again, this delightful cross could not be located outside its Canadian context. (The term fretty, as applied to a cross in the British texts, usually applies to one that is parted and whose parts are interlaced at the point of junction).
Cross Latin of Spearheads Neilson A unique cross used in a Canadian grant.
Cross, Mission Town of Midland The Mission Cross has each arm terminating in spruce-tree shapes. It is used by communities originating as religious missions.
Crossconnect MacDonald, R. A symbol used by telecommunications engineers, the crossconnect has been used in Canada to symbolize armigers working in that field.
Cross Pilawa Hrycajkiw, AJ This Polish cross resembles a cross patriarchal, but with an additional arm extending to sinister of the vertical member, forming “two and one-half of a cross”. It has historical rather than religious significance, commemorating the battle of Pilawa in 1166. It is used in the arms of a number of related Polish armorial "clans".

 
Copyright © 2008 Royal Heraldry Society of Canada (RHSC)
Released: November 18, 2008 / Last modified: November 27, 2009